The Drought Diaries

Introduction By Eilene Lyon August 1, 1936, Saturday July has gone, and still no rain. This is the worst summer yet. -- Ann Marie Low Dust Bowl Diary May 30, 2018 Free2BD and I decided to take a drive in the convertible up East Animas Road. It was one of those days when the cotton-ball... Continue Reading →

Celestial Blackmail?

Week 23: #52 Ancestors – Going to the Chapel By Eilene Lyon There’s no question that Great-grandma Clara was a staunch supporter of the Methodist Church. Her father (God rest his soul) had been a lay preacher in the faith, after all. She was abstemious, and thought everyone else should be, too. (I do hope... Continue Reading →

Absurdities #7

By Eilene Lyon I was puzzling over the use of the term "Dogfight" to describe an aerial combat. It seems odd, considering that the only "flying" dogs I've ever come across are Snoopy, who is forever losing his Sopwith Camel (an entirely absurd name for a plane, I might add, especially when it’s really a... Continue Reading →

He Dreamed of Being a Marine

Week 21: #52 Ancestors – Military By Eilene Lyon Nathan Everett Halse entered this world at 3:30 p.m., Friday June 22, 1945, weighing six pounds, 3 ½ ounces. He was the fourth son born to Everett and Reatha Halse. Unlike his brothers, he was born in Corvallis, Oregon, not the family’s home state of South... Continue Reading →

Race, the Census, and Genealogy

By Eilene Lyon Race in the Census From the very first U. S. Census in 1790, the enumeration was focused primarily on whites, and secondarily on everyone else. A person was listed as Free White, Other Free Person, or Slave. Based on the constitution, non-taxed Indians were specifically excluded.1 It wasn’t until the 1850 Census,... Continue Reading →

Famous Names?

By Eilene Lyon A post by InNate James discussed his possible family connection to the notorious outlaw, Jesse James.  He mentioned that the James family tried to disassociate themselves from him. That was not a universal response to his deeds, though. My family tree sports one “Jesse James Brooks,” for example.1 He was born in... Continue Reading →

A Beloved Mother Passes Too Soon

Week 19: #52 Ancestors – Mother’s Day By Eilene Lyon My grandpa, Laurence M. Smith, lost his mother when he was just nine years old. Though his family had known severe hardships in the early years, Laurence remembered the family’s better fortunes from the time of his birth in 1908 until his mother died. Mary... Continue Reading →

Reatha Gusso, 1932

Week 18: #52Ancestors – Close Up By Eilene Lyon Being an Army brat, I didn’t grow up close to my extended family. But I always had a special affinity for my paternal grandmother, Reatha (Gusso) Halse. Her home was in Corvallis, Oregon, and she worked at Oregon State University in the chemical lab supply room.... Continue Reading →

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

Entomology Today

Brought to you by the Entomological Society of America

Tom's Nature-up-close Photography and Mindfulness Blog

Mindfulness, Philosophy, Spirituality, Meditation, Awareness, Religion, Nature Photography

Writer Side Of Life

Kim Jacque - Scribbles from a sleep-deprived crafter of tall tales

Under the Mirror

An exploration into our underwater world

Luanne Castle's Writer Site

Memoir, poetry, & writing theory

The Buddha's Advice to Laypeople

Guidelines for developing a happier life

Myra H. Mcilvain

Author of Award-Winning Stein House, historical fiction set in the 19th C Texas seaport of Indianola that blew away in the 1886 hurricane.

Anne Fisher-Ahlert

An Editor Writes

Through Open Lens

Home of Lukas Kondraciuk Photography

writingasaprofession

A candid mentoring source for writers

THE SPECTACLED BEAN

Tales, Thoughts + Tribulations of a Free Spirit in Suburbia

Second Wind Leisure Perspectives

Fun, Fitness & Photography

Life On The Skinny Branches

A Closeted Introvert Attempts to Live Life Out Loud

Swimmers

A way to exchange

Dispatches From the Former New World

AN ENGLISHWOMAN IN AMERICA