A Tale of Two Cups

By Eilene Lyon

“Why do you keep using that old measuring cup?” asked my co-doggy parent (aka husband, Pat). “It’s cloudy and chipped, and we have this nice one.”

“I can’t give you an answer that would satisfy you,” I replied.

So why do I keep using the ugly, old 2-cup measure? I don’t really recall when I acquired it. Did it used to belong to my mom? Or did I buy it after I left home and got my own apartment? Even if I didn’t get it from Mom, it looks just like the one she used to have.

It doesn’t make any sense to be sentimental about a kitchen implement my mother used once upon a time. She was a terrible cook. (A crime to which she will readily confess.)

Perhaps my grandmothers had measuring cups identical to this old one? (Now, grandmas, they knew how to cook, right?)

Actually, I was the one who enjoyed learning to bake when I was a teenager. Maybe I’m just wistful about all those pies, cookies and breads I turned out back in the day.

(I rarely bake sweets anymore – don’t need the sugar – and I quit baking bread after that second-degree burn I gave myself.)

I do still occasionally use a recipe handed down from my grandmothers, via my mom (see sausage stuffing recipe below). I like recreating the flavors from my childhood. But I’m just not that emotionally attached to things like measuring cups.

When it comes down to it, I like the way the old cup fits my hand, and it actually doesn’t hold as much as the newer one. The old one measures out the perfect amount of fruit for my morning smoothies. The new one would encourage over-consumption. And we sure wouldn’t want that now, would we?

P1150052

6 thoughts on “A Tale of Two Cups

Add yours

  1. I love this! I have gotten so attached to the old kitchen utensils (particularly mixing bowls, measuring cups and spoons) that I grew up using. I was devastated when my mom threw out the mixing bowls without telling me.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. My late Dad gave me a second-hand, bone-handled carving fork when I got my first flat. I mentioned it to my mum a few years ago and she told me that it belonged to his mother who died before I was born. Now it’s extra special (it’s still in use but not allowed in the dishwasher.)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think there’s something about utensils and tools that give us a very tactile connection to our ancestors. And maybe we just like the practicality, too! I think things were made a better quality, made to last, in earlier generations.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

The Zombies Ate My Brains

Rescuing what might remain of the grey matter.

Captured and Exposed

Tales from the Annals of Crime

The Letters

Louise Mabey

the rescued photo

discovering the story it tells

Tokens of Companionship

Portraits from the first 100 years of photography

Teralbah

A Family History in Australia

My Family Finds

A genealogical journey

Cinziarosa's Descendants (c)

Welcome to My Immigrant, Family Research, and Ancestry Blog

Gerry's Family History

Sharing stories from my family history

A Frank Angle

Thoughts from the Inner Mind

Wangiwriter's Blog

A blog about my writing and the things that I care about

Julie Around The Globe

The less traveled paths

FamilyHistoryNinja

Stories from my family history research.

BREVITY's Nonfiction Blog

(Somewhat) Daily News from the World of Literary Nonfiction

Chips Off the Old Block

A blog devoted to genealogical wanderings - dedicated to family near and far, through distance and time

Everyone Has a Story

My Family Stories

Baugh, Bass, and Beyond

Finding the facts behind the legends!

Hollywood Genes

Formerly Fading, But Not Forgotten 🌸 Zoe Krainik Blogs about Old Hollywood and Genealogy

WE CHOOSE TO IGNORE SUFFERING WHEN OUR FEAR EXCEEDS OUR MERCY

a nurses' perspective on the need for reform of our current healthcare system

%d bloggers like this: